PERFORMA_12 – University of Kentucky College of Design

Mike McKay and his studio Performa held at the University Of Kentucky College Of Design is prime example of material performance, digital design, and simple geometry brought to reality.  Performa was intense research fabrication studio that continues to push rapid prototyping production for a greater understanding of material limits and their ability to create structure.  Check it out after the jump and get a  glimpses of the students original models and boards.

STUDENTS: Adriana Torres, Anne Schwab, Bethany Long, Brian Moore, Brian Oldiges, Darcy Osting, David Dudley, Jaime Lam, Jeff Guiducci, Madelynn Ringo, & Taisa Sehic
SCHOOL: 
University of Kentucky College of Design
PROFESSORS:  Mike McKay
YEAR:
2012

 

“McKay’s research work involves the investigation of material systems and design strategies that create multi-performative material systems utilizing optimization, aggregation and efficiency. Simple units and semi-finished materials are physically tested in order to extract potential performative characteristics and limits. These limits are then negotiated through rigorous digital and physical techniques in order to produce strategies of fabrication. The formal systems have inherent structural capacities and an ability to adapt to changing conditions. Because of the system pliability, variation can occur within a seemingly homogenous system.” (1)

“The PERFORMA Studio at the UK College of Design is an intensive research and fabrication studio run by professor Mike McKay. McKay’s research work involves the investigation of material systems and design strategies that create multi-performative material systems utilizing optimization, aggregation and efficiency. Simple units and semi-finished materials are physically tested in order to extract potential performative characteristics and limits.

These limits are then negotiated through rigorous digital and physical techniques in order to produce strategies of fabrication. The formal systems have inherent structural capacities and an ability to adapt to changing conditions. Because of the system pliability, variation can occur within a seemingly homogenous system.

The challenge of the PERFORMA research is to engage a methodology that allows the designer to create dynamic formal systems using SIMPLE materials and methods without the need to rely on “rapid prototyping” techniques. Mass customized materials take a tremendous amount of time and energy to produce and usually are simply a product of software techniques or machining limits. By “removing” reliances on software and output machines, the students are forced to engage a whole host of limits that otherwise would be ignored by simply “outputting.” It is then the responsibility of the designer not only to invent the individual unit and subsequent system but also find the means of fabrication that make it possible.” (2)

Images and Text via:
(1) http://archinect.com/features/article/55629733/student-works-performa_12
(2) http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/2012/08/20/performa-12/

Fabrication Team: Aaron Fritsch, Ben Kolder, Christian Newman, Ben WardPhotos: Magnus Lindqvist / GLINTstudios.com

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3 thoughts on “PERFORMA_12 – University of Kentucky College of Design

  1. A terrific project that brought back memories of my story-boards from my interior design degree. Design projects with simple materials where the brain engages in the work more than being reliant upon the computer software, I like this idea

    • To bad you still don’t have those story-boards to check out! However the ability to understand materials actual potentials, rather then forcing a material into the desired shape, has become a stronger parti for architectural discourses.

  2. Pingback: PERFORMA_12 - University of Kentucky College of...

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